Monday, August 24, 2015

Master Yu Guo Shun Chen 22 Form

Chen Style Tai Chi Chuan is not as well-known as Yang style Tai Chi; however, Chen Style Tai Chi was the original. All Tai Chi Styles where born from Chen Style. Chen Tai Chi has 4 long forms of practice, 2 old frame forms and 2 new frame forms. To meet the needs of westerners, shorter forms were created and promoted in China. Most famous Chen 19 form and Chen 38 form created by Chen Xiaowang, 19th generation lineage holder of the Chen style.

Here is a link to my teacher Master Yu Guo Shun, new Chen 22 form. It is a previlage to study with such a Tai Chi Master. 



Friday, July 3, 2015

Qigong for Stress Relief and Relixation

I am leading a Qigong for Stress Relief and Relaxation Workshop on Sunday July 12, 6:30pm. Qigong is an ancient Chinese meditative practice designed to open energy pathways and increase internal energy (Qi) flow. This Qigong for Stress Workshop will feature different systems of Qigong that follow the basic tenants and principles of this great practice – including focused breathing, visualization techniques, posture, and body movements. The unique part of Qigong is that the exercises not only strengthen and heal the body; they also strengthen and heal the mind, balance the emotions, and boost your overall energy level.

http://www.antheayoga.com/events/upcoming-events/qigong-strees-relief/

July 12 @ 6:30pm - 8:30pm | $20 pre-registration, $25 day of workshop

Anthea Center & Healing Art Center
34-01 45th Street, 2nd Floor
Queens, NY 11101
Astoria / Long Island City
http://www.antheayoga.com/



Friday, June 19, 2015

Chen Style 19 Form



The Chen 19 Form was created by Grandmaster Chen Xiao Wang (19th generation grandmaster of Chen Style) after he received numerous requests for a short form -- the Chen answer to the Yang 24 Form, which is the most popular short form in the world. The form is composed of 19 movements. It is suitable for beginners and offers a good foundation to help progress your Tai Chi practice. The form is a combination of postures from the three traditional Chen style Tai Chi routines:  Lao Jia (Old Frame), Xin Jia (New Frame), and the Xiao Jia (Small Frame).

First Section
1. Opening the form.
2. Buddha’s Warrior attendant steps forward from the temple.
3. Lazily tie coat.
4. Step up walk obliquely.
5. Step up three steps.
6. Hiding hand punch, left.
7. Double pushing hands.

Second Section
8. Whirling upper arms.
9. Flashing the back.
10. Hiding hand punch, right.
11. Six sealings, four closing.

Third Section
12. Wave hands like clouds.
13. High pat on horse.
14. Right heel kick.
15. Left heel kick.

Fourth Section
16. Part the wild horse's mane.
17. Jade maiden works shuttles.
18. Buddha's warrior attendant pounds mortar.
19. Close the form.



Thursday, May 14, 2015

WHERE IS YOUR MIND WHEN YOU EXERCISE?

By Ramel Rones
You do exactly the number of repetitions you are supposed to. You hold the stretches for exactly the right amount of time. You do your routine everyday, and and you do it first thing in the morning before anything else. Even before checking email.
But you're still stressed out. You still have anxieties that plague you during the day. You still can't get a great night's sleep.
It's probably because your mind is wandering while you workout.
Half of all mind-body regimens is in the mind. Doing the exercise is good for your heart, but thinking about that project your have to get done at work is bad for your heart. Stress-induced hormones increase your blood pressure and put you on high alert, making it impossible to relax as your thoughts spin around the source of your anxiety.
Put away the timer and start exercising for as long as it takes to feel relaxed. Go muscle by muscle, and move your mind into that part of your body. Picture the muscle and soft tissue like ice, frozen, but melting from your mind focusing on it, like heat from the sun.
Afraid you won't have time to get fully relaxed? Go to bed earlier and wake up earlier. Put yourself in a position where your schedule is wide open when you start stretching, so you can go as long as you need to without constantly checking the clock.
Eventually you should be able to feel each muscle by putting your mind there, and you should be able to consciously relax it with a deep breath.
Focus on your breathing too. Do whatever makes it easier for your to let go of your stress for this hour, or half-hour, each day. You don't need to solve your life problems or get any work done right now. Right now, you need to relax your body and mind.
Doing Tai Chi with a monkey mind is like not doing Tai Chi at all. Bring that energy down from your head to your center and cool off. A meditative mind is kind of like a sauna: you don't need to spend all day in there to feel the benefits. A little bit every day works too.

Monday, May 11, 2015

Tai Chi 24 Form Yang Style

1. Commencing 
2. Part the horse's mane 
3. White crane spreads its wings 
4. Brush knee and push hand
5. Playing guitar 
6. Repulse like monkey
7. Grasp sparrow's tail (left) 
8. Grasp sparrow's tail (right) 
9. Single whip 
10. Wave hands like clouds 
11. Single Whip 
12. High Pat on horse
13. Right heel kick 
14. Strike to ears with both fists 
15. Turn body and left heel kick 
16. Snake creeps down (L) & Golden rooster stands on one leg 
17. Snake creeps down (R) & Golden rooster stands on one leg 
18. Fair lady works at shuttles 
19. Needle at sea bottom 
20. Fan through back 
21. Turn body, deflect, parry and punch 
22. Apparent closure 
23. Cross closure 
24. Closing

Monday, April 27, 2015

Qigong for Stress Workshop

I am leading a Qigong for Stress Workshop on May 9. Qigong is an ancient Chinese meditative practice designed to open energy pathways and increase internal energy (Qi) flow. This Qigong for Stress Workshop will feature different systems of Qigong that follow the basic tenants and principles of this great practice – including focused breathing, visualization techniques, posture, and body movements. The unique part of Qigong is that the exercises not only strengthen and heal the body; they also strengthen and heal the mind, balance the emotions, and boost your overall energy level.

May 9th @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm | $20 pre-registration, $23 day of workshop

Anthea Center & Healing Art Center
34-01 45th Street, 2nd Floor
Queens, NY 11101
Astoria / Long Island City
http://www.antheayoga.com/



Monday, April 20, 2015

World Tai Chi Day in Bryant Park This Saturday

The Tai Chi Chuan Center will celebrate its 13th World Tai Chi Day in Bryant Park on Saturday, April 25, 2015. There will be free classes and demonstrations by students from CK Chu Tai Chi from 11:00 am to 2:00 pm, near the fountain at the western entrance on 6th Avenue and 41st Street. Participants are advised to wear loose clothing and flat shoes or sneakers. All are welcome to participate so bring your friends and family.

Schedule of Events (all classes open to the public)

-- 10:45 the day begins with the Tai Chi short form. (Students will continue to practice the form non-stop until roughly 2 pm on the north side of the terrace.)
-- 10:55 Eternal Spring Chi Kung™ Class (an exercise system developed by Grandmaster Chu),
-- 11:40 Flute Form and Two-Person Stick demonstrations
-- 11:55 Nei Kung Class (a related discipline to chi kung)
-- 12:40 Broadsword and Double-Edge Sword demonstrations
-- 12:50 Tai Chi Class (an introductory class in the tai chi short form)
-- 1:20 San Shou Demonstration
-- 1:25 Push-Hands Class (an introductory class in a two-person drill)
-- 1:40 Long Form and Fast Form Demonstrations
-- 2:15 Conclusion

The celebration also kicks off the Tai Chi Chuan Center’s summer-long program of Free Eternal Spring/Tai Chi Classes in Bryant Park. Classes will be held from April 28 to September 29 on Tuesday and Thursday mornings, 7:30 am to 8:30 am. This program has delivered tens of thousands of free class hours over the last eleven years, with average class sizes of more than forty people.


ABOUT THE TAI CHI CHUAN CENTER. The Tai Chi Chuan Center  is a not-for-profit organization that aims to promote health in body, mind and spirit through the teaching of Grandmaster C.K. Chu’s Tai Chi curriculum. For more information, contact program coordinator Jeremy W. Hubbell at 212.221.6110.





 

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Chang San-Feng: The Theory of Tai Chi


In any action, the whole body should be light and agile.
One should feel that all of the body’s joints are connected with full linkage.
Qi should be stirred. The spirit of vitality, or shen, should be concentrated inwards.
Do not show any deficiency, neither concavity nor convexity in movement.
Do not show disconnected movement.
The jin is rooted in the feet, bursts out in the legs, is controlled by the waist and functions through the hands.
From the feet to the legs, legs to the waist; all should be moved as a unit.
By moving as a unit, one can advance or retreat with precise timing and have the most advantageous position.
If precise timing and good position are not achieved and the body does not move as a unit, then the waist and legs need more development; they may not be strong or flexible enough.
This often shows when moving up or down, backwards or forwards.
Where there is something up, there must be something down.
Where there is something forwards, there must be something backwards.
Where there is something left, there must be something right.
If one intends to move up, one must simultaneously show a contrary tendency (downwards) and loosen the roots, so that it can be easily pushed off.
One must distinguish substantiality from insubstantiality.
Where there is substantiality, there must be insubstantiality.
In all ways, one has to distinguish one from the other.
The whole body should be linked together through every joint; do not show any interruptions.





What is Qi Gong

By Lee Holden

Qi is often translated as life force energy.  To the ancient masters, energy was that elusive substance we are all seeking.   It is that vital force that makes life exciting, fun, creative, and joyful.  Instinctively we know that the more energy we have, the better we feel.

Energy is the invisible, immaterial substance that propagates life and animates our bodies with movement.  Energy is in the air we breathe, the food we eat, and the emotions we feel.  Energy is not just in our bodies, but permeates all of nature:  Mountains arising, forests growing, rivers flowing, and all life proliferating are expressions of this life-force energy.

Quantum physicists and mystics from all ages agree that we are literally made of and living within a limitless sea of energy.   How is it then, that we suffer chronic low energy, fatigue, or poor health?  Medical surveys show that “lack of energy” and high levels of stress are the biggest complaints in physicians" offices today.

Think about it this way: If the power lines go down or flicker on and off during a storm, everything in the house stops working or only works sporadically.   Without electricity, we have no heat, we can"t cook our food, watch TV, or use the computer.   If we apply the same principles to our minds and bodies, we see that low energy causes shortages in our overall vitality, the way we metabolize food, our stress levels, our libido, our creativity, and our enjoyment of life.

Qi means "energy" as well as "breath".   Gong (also spelled Kung) is a general term meaning "work" or "skill".   Hence the term "Qi Gong" may be translated as "breathing exercise" as well as "energy work".   In terms of the practice of qi gong exercises it signifies “an expertise at working with life force energy.”  Becoming an expert at working with our own internal energy gives us the resources to have choices and manifest the kind of day and life that we want to have.

The Chinese character for qi signifies vapor or mist rising off of rice.   Vapor or mist is a wonderful metaphor of qi because it is invisible yet tangible.   Vapor also alludes to breath or breathing.   The subtle skill of breath control is one of the keys to circulating the flow of internal energy in the body.

Qi gong is based on the premise that the human body is an energy system.   As long as it has energy, or qi, it is alive; when energy is gone, it is dead.   Based on the primordial principles of classical Taoist philosophy, qi gong is a simple and practical approach to become skilled in matters of health, happiness and spiritual attainment.   Qi gong practitioners learns how to tap into their own inner resources and become self-sufficient and skilled at working with their own internal energy.

Qi gong amplifies the internal energy of practitioners, enabling them to become full of vitality, healthy, emotionally balanced, and spiritually connected.   This creates inner balance and harmony that leads to longevity and a deep sense of purpose in life.

People watching qi gong only see slow graceful movement or simple stretches.   People often ask, “How can that get you in shape or train you to be a better martial artist?”  But, there is a lot more to qi gong than meets the eye.   Like an iceberg, what you can see and witness in a qi gong practice is only the surface of a much deeper and potent internal power.   Qi gong is simple: it requires no equipment, little space, and can be practiced in a short amount of time.   Yet simple as it seems, qi gong brings an incredible amount of healing power to the practitioner---so much so that some of the effects and cures it achieves are often discounted as "miracles," even by eye-witness observers.   Qi gong has an unseen depth that can be utilized to enhance your body's natural healing potential.   Also, it can help you tap into your own deep inner resources. From that place of power, you can bring forth whatever it is that you want to experience.